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Ever walked into a house and just felt, well, uncomfortable?


Does clutter give you panic attacks?


Does putting a hat on the bed make you feel uneasy?


Do you get a bad energy when you walk into a certain room in your house?


Sure, it could be the vibe. Or it could be the Feng Shui.


Feng shui is an ancient Chinese practice that has become increasingly popular in the Western world as a way to create a harmonious and balanced environment. At its core, feng shui is about arranging your environment in a way that promotes positive energy flow, or chi.


While it may seem like a complex and expensive practice, incorporating feng shui principles into your home can be done on a limited budget, and with the latest styling trends.







One of the most basic principles of feng shui is to create a clutter-free environment. This means getting rid of anything that no longer serves you or brings negative energy into your space. Start by clearing out any excess furniture, clothes, or other items that are taking up space and creating a sense of disorganisation.


Once you've de-cluttered, it's time to give your space a deep clean. Feng shui is all about promoting positive energy flow, and a clean and tidy space is essential for achieving this. Make sure to pay attention to areas that are often overlooked, such as behind furniture and under beds.



Another important aspect of feng shui is the use of natural elements, such as wood, water, and plants, to create a sense of balance and harmony in your space. These elements can be incorporated in a variety of ways, even on a limited budget.


For example, you can add plants to your space to bring in the energy of growth and vitality. Choose plants that are easy to care for and suited to the light conditions in your home. You can also add water elements, such as a small tabletop fountain or a fish tank, to promote the flow of positive energy.

Incorporating wood elements is also essential in feng shui. You can do this by adding wooden furniture, such as a coffee table or bookshelf, or even by adding small wooden accents, such as a wooden picture frame or a wooden vase.




Colour is another important element in feng shui, as it can affect the energy flow in your space. When choosing colors, it's important to consider the mood and energy you want to create.

For example, red is a powerful color that can stimulate energy and passion, but it can also be overwhelming if used excessively. Blue, on the other hand, is a calming color that promotes relaxation and tranquility. Choose colours that resonate with you and create the energy you want to feel in your space.






The bedroom is one of the most important areas of the home in feng shui, as it's where you go to rest and recharge. When arranging your bedroom, it's important to consider the placement of the bed, as well as the colours and decor.


Ideally, your bed should be positioned so that you can see the door from your bed, but not in line with the door. This helps create a sense of security and promotes restful sleep. Choose bedding and decor that promotes a sense of calm and relaxation, such as soft colors and textures.



The Bagua Map is a powerful tool used in the ancient Chinese practice of Feng Shui, which aims to create a harmonious and balanced living environment by manipulating the flow of energy, or Qi, in a space.


The Bagua Map is a grid that divides a space into nine areas, each of which represents a specific aspect of life, such as health, wealth, love, and career. The map is typically placed over a floor plan of a home, office, or other space, with the bottom of the map aligned with the entrance to the space.


Each of the nine areas on the map corresponds to a different aspect of life and is associated with a particular color, element, shape, and number.

The nine areas of the Bagua Map are:

  1. Career - located at the bottom center of the map, this area is associated with water, the color black, and the number one.

  2. Knowledge - located at the bottom left of the map, this area is associated with earth, the color blue or green, and the number eight.

  3. Family - located at the bottom right of the map, this area is associated with wood, the color green or brown, and the number three.

  4. Prosperity - located in the middle left of the map, this area is associated with wood, the color purple or red, and the number four.

  5. Fame - located in the middle center of the map, this area is associated with fire, the color red, and the number nine.

  6. Relationships - located in the middle right of the map, this area is associated with metal, the color white or gray, and the number seven.

  7. Children and Creativity - located in the top left of the map, this area is associated with metal, the color white or gray, and the number six.

  8. Helpful People and Travel - located in the top center of the map, this area is associated with metal, the color white or gray, and the number six.

  9. Health - located in the top right of the map, this area is associated with earth, the color yellow or brown, and the number two.

Each area of the Bagua Map has its own set of characteristics and energies. For example, the career area is associated with your professional life and your path in life, while the prosperity area is associated with your financial abundance and abundance in life in general. To use the Bagua Map, a Feng Shui practitioner will typically first determine the Bagua Map for a particular space and then assess the energy flow in each of the nine areas. If an area is lacking in energy or is cluttered or blocked, the practitioner may recommend specific adjustments to enhance the energy flow in that area. These adjustments may include adding specific colors or elements to the area, rearranging furniture, or adding specific Feng Shui objects, such as mirrors or plants.

In addition to its use in individual spaces, the Bagua Map can also be used to analyse the energy flow in a larger area, such as a neighborhood or city. In this case, the Bagua Map is overlaid onto a map of the larger area, and the energy flow in each of the nine areas is assessed.



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